Journal Of Investigative Dermatology

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Updated: 2 hours 28 min ago

A Modeling Conundrum: Murine Models for Cutaneous Wound Healing

Sun, 2018-04-01 00:00
The complexity of the cutaneous wound healing process and its impairment in disease states, combined with the urgent clinical need for new therapies demand well-defined preclinical models that facilitate translation of research findings to clinical use. Many murine wound models are well suited for studying mechanisms of various aspects of wound healing, but they have shown limited utility for translating research findings to human conditions, thereby impeding therapeutic developments. Ansell et al.

A Fibroblast Is Not a Fibroblast Is Not a Fibroblast

Sun, 2018-04-01 00:00
Fibrosis after injury is a huge public health concern, leading to morbidity, mortality, and expenditure of billions of health care dollars. Recent mouse studies have shown that dermal fibroblasts are heterogeneous. New research using single-cell RNA sequencing to identify major fibroblast populations in humans is paving the way to a better understanding of fibroblast heterogeneity and fibrosis.

Sun-protection behaviour, pubertal development and menarche: factors influencing the melanocytic nevi development. The results of a observational study on 1512 children

Sat, 2018-03-31 00:00
Observational studies consistently show that melanocytic nevus prevalence increases with age and that phenotypic traits are significantly associated with nevus count in children. An observational study of 1512 children and adolescents from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. Study dermatologists counted the full body, arm, and facial nevi of each participant. Children and their parents were asked to complete a survey to gather data on personal characteristics, pubertal development and early-life sun exposure.

Sun-protection behaviour, pubertal development and menarche: factors influencing the melanocytic nevi development. The results of a observational study on 1512 children

Sat, 2018-03-31 00:00
Observational studies consistently show that melanocytic nevus prevalence increases with age and that phenotypic traits are significantly associated with nevus count in children. An observational study of 1512 children and adolescents from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. Study dermatologists counted the full body, arm, and facial nevi of each participant. Children and their parents were asked to complete a survey to gather data on personal characteristics, pubertal development and early-life sun exposure.

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